Don’t make anything you will use only once

As a teacher, I struggle with the tension between wanting to be a great teacher and wanting to be a great business. After all, a teacher does everything he can for his students. A business tries to maximize the return on what it does.

So, maybe a great teacher would invest an hour learning about a company’s products in order to make one really great worksheet. A great business, however, would acknowledge that, as long as your pay is the same on a per-lesson basis, every extra unit of prep time you invest dilutes your return per hour.

Don’t kid yourself: you deserve a decent return per hour.

So, what can you do?

Automation

I made a web application that automates the vocabulary side of my lessons. Of course I’ll plug that shamelessly here.

But there’s a lot more you can do.

Raid the internet

My thoughts on the correct level of internet-to-self produced worksheets are not completely formalized. On the one hand, you don’t want to create the impression that your professional training didn’t amount to much more than a few internet searches.

On the other hand, though, my students are generally happy to get their hands on ‘different’ stuff. My stuff has a feel, a certain personality to it. And, I tend to use certain words. Things from the internet broaden all of that.

That’s one obvious way to maximize your return on the time you spend.

Reuse everything you make

There is only so much you can hide behind the “it’s good to expose you to different vocabularies and accents” argument. You’re getting paid to prepare a lesson, and it’s nice to show your customers that they’re getting their money’s worth.

To speak to the side of you that wants to be a great teacher, I should point out that students respond more to things that you have made for them. Even grizzled old adults like the idea that someone invested time in them, and they respond better to it. Almost everything I make available at NewSporkCity.com is something I made along those lines.

Branding

A quick aside here: Before I talk about how I reuse stuff, I thought I’d point out that your students won’t know that you invested so much time making great materials unless you make them clearly yours. Use a header (or a footer) or distinct formatting or something so that, when your students get their hands on materials that you have made, they know it comes from you.

There are a handful of ways to reuse material. And they probably all deserve their own blog post. (Note to self, write them.)

Here are the ideas that come to mind:

  • Get two or more courses to run ‘parallel’ to each other in some way, whether it’s in grammar (if the courses are at about the same level) or in material (you can prepare travel activities that work with a lower level group as well as a higher level group). Then, prepare material that you can use with all the groups.
  • Master the art of organization. I struggle with this, but I know that it’s costing me time (and, therefore, Euros). If you know you’ll have a great activity with your own look and feel to use again and again later, you can spend that hour in prep time without feeling like a bad business person.
  • Reuse material in the same course. After covering some grammar point with great worksheets from the Internet, I’ll make up a review activity covering the same grammar, but with the students’ names and vocabulary from their company (or from our group). After we go over it in class as a sort of final review — ideally getting a few laughs along the way — I put it aside for a bit, then cut it into strips and mix it with other grammar that we mastered for an envelope review activity.
  • Make your own worksheet series. This sounds like a ton of work, but it’s basically the story behind the Absurd Business Worksheets that I make. I taught the topics so often, that I realized it just made sense to have something that looked like it came from me and so that I could leave out the parts that I never taught on other worksheets. It was a ton of time, once. But it’s been paid back to me many times.
  • Share your work. If you have a really great idea that you can only use in one class, go ahead and make it. Put it where you can find it if you need it again, and then share it with your colleagues. Post it on worksheet sharing sites like ISLCollective or try to make a few bucks on TeachersPayTeachers. The point is, you can get other returns from your work.

What do you think? Have I missed a great technique for recycling work? Are you the kind of person who makes everything fresh for every class? Do you have some tricks in how you do it quickly?

These are all things I’d like to know.

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